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Table 3 Search strategies used for patient preferences

From: Methods to perform systematic reviews of patient preferences: a literature survey

Review Strategy used to search for preference studies
Belinchón, 2016 Search terms included “preferences” and “utility”.
Bereza, 2015 Search terms included “preference” and “utilities”.
Blanchard, 2016 Search terms included “patient preference”, “patient priorities” and the different patient stated-preference methods, such as “rating”, “ranking”, “best-worst”, “self-explicated”, “value-based conjoint analysis”, “rating-based conjoint analysis”, “choice-based conjoint analysis”, “take it or leave it”, “tradeoff” and “trade-off”.
Blinman, 2010 Search terms included “preference”, “utility”, “attitude”, “expectation” and “willingness”.
Bradley, 2007 Search terms included “patient preferences”, “patient satisfaction” and “patient participation”.
Brooker, 2013 Search terms included those that relate to “patient perspectives”, “satisfaction”, “preferences” and “values”.
Currie, 2014 Search terms included those that relate to existing patient preference elicitation methodologies: “patient preference”, “shared decision-making”, “patient involvement”, “patient participation”, “patient satisfaction”, “physician–patient relation”, “standard gamble”, “time trade-off”, “willingness to trade”, “willingness to pay”, “decision board” and “discrete choice experiment”.
Damm, 2014 Search terms included “patient” and “preference or willingness”.
Eek, 2016 Search terms included “preference”, “prefer”, “preferred”, “choice”, “select” and “selection”.
Eiring, 2015 Comprehensive search strategies were developed (see http://0-bmjopen.bmj.com.brum.beds.ac.uk/content/5/4/e007848).
Emberton, 2010 Search terms included “patient preference”, “perception” and “satisfaction”.
Gutknecht, 2016 Search terms included keywords of preference methods in health economics: “preferences”, “conjoint analysis”, “choice model”, “discrete choice”, “DCE”, “decision analysis”, “multi-criteria decision analysis”, “MCDA”, “multi-attribute utility”, “analytic hierarchy process”, “AHP”, “trade-off”, “best-worst scaling”, “willingness-to-pay”, “WTP”, “willingness to accept”, “contingent valuation” and “standard gamble”.
Hamelinck, 2014 Search terms included “patient preference”, “choice”, “decision”, “choice behavior”, “decision making” and “patient satisfaction”.
Joy, 2013 Search terms included “conjoint analysis”, “satisfaction”, “choice model”, “stated preference”, “discrete choice”, “DCE”, “decision analysis”, “preferences”, “multicriteria decision analysis”, “MCDA”, “multi-attribute utility”, “analytic hierarchy process”, “trade off”, “self-explicated”, “best-worst scaling”, “utilities”, “preference weight”, “willingness to pay”, “WTP”, “willingness to accept”, “contingent valuation”, “priorities” and “valuation”.
Lytvyn, 2016 Search terms included “health utility”, “patient values”, “patient preferences” and “health-related quality of life”.
MacLean, 2012 Unclear
Mansfield, 2016 Search terms included “conjoint analysis”, “discrete choice”, “discrete ranking” and “discrete rank”.
Phillips, 2006 Search terms included “patient satisfaction”, “numerical data”, “consumer satisfaction”, “health knowledge”, “attitudes”, “practice”, “choice behavior”, “conjoint analysis”, “contingent valuation”, “stated preference”, “discrete choice” and “willingness to pay”.
Purnell, 2014 Search terms included methods to assess patient preferences (e.g., “conjoint analysis”, “decision analysis”, “utilities”, and “stated preferences”).
Sadique, 2011 Search terms included “preferences”, “values”, “willingness-to-pay” and “utility”.
Schatz, 2015 Search terms included “patient preferences”, “stated preferences”, “discrete choice”, “conjoint analysis”, “best worst”, “maximum difference”, “standard gamble”, “time trade-off” and “utility values”.
Schmidt, 2016 Search terms included “patient”, “preference”, and “willingness”.
Showalter, 2015 Search terms included “conjoint analysis”, “satisfaction”, “choice model”, “stated preference”, “discrete choice”, “DCE”, “decision analysis”, “preferences”, “multi-criteria decision analysis”, “MCDA”, “multi-attribute utility”, “analytic hierarchy process”, “trade off”, “self-explicated”, “best-worst scaling”, “utilities”, “preference weight”, “willingness to pay”, “WTP”, “willingness to accept”, “contingent valuation”, “priorities” and “valuation”.
Stewart, 2016 Search terms included “stated preference(s)”, “time trade-off”, “standard gamble”, “conjoint”, “contingent valuation”, “discrete choice” and “willingness-to-pay”.
Umar, 2012 Search terms included “patient preferences”, “shared decision-making”, “patient involvement”, “patient participation”, “patient satisfaction” and “physician-patient relation”.
Van Brunt, 2011 Search terms included “health state utility”, “utility”, “discrete choice”, “standard gamble”, “time trade-off”, “quality-adjusted life year”, “conjoint analysis”, “patient preference”, “preference”, “prefer”, “satisfaction”, “acceptability”, “decision” and “choice”.
Von Arx, 2014 Search terms included “stated preference”, “willingness to pay”, “willingness to accept”, “choice modelling”, “conjoint analysis”, “discrete choice experiment” and “contingent valuation”.
Wilke, 2016 Search terms included “discrete choice experiment”, “treatment preference”, “conjoint” and “trade off”.
Wortley, 2014 Search terms included “stated preference” and “choice experiment”.